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dividing line Prompt Byte

The how-to newsletter from Prompt PR

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London


22 Upper Ground

Eighth Floor

London

SE1 9PD


Boston


745 Atlantic Ave

Third Floor

Boston

MA 02111


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Welcome…

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Happy Friday everybody and welcome to another edition of the Prompt Byte. We hope you’ve had a great week and are ready for some new tips.

This week, we talk about ‘social’ acceptable copy, the three things to focus on while gearing up for a product launch and having a good newsletter. And don’t forget – we want to hear your Geek Speak guesses! Get in touch on Twitter.

Happy reading,

Hazel

Hazel Butters

CEO

Prompt PR

Twitter: @PromptLondon and @PromptBoston

Facebook: Prompt London and Prompt Boston

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How to
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How to think about product launches: Vision, authority and impact

At Prompt we help entrepreneurs and businesses launch products: apps, hardware, consumer technologies, innovative gadgets, business products and services, and high-end, complex enterprise products.

Many product launches are driven by a desire to increase sales. But selling your product, service or idea isn’t just about money – it’s about something much bigger than that. It’s about having an impact.

When we are talking to clients on the essential groundwork for effective communication that engages, influence (and helps to drive sales) we work on three core areas: vision, authority and impact.

Vision
This is the purpose behind the company or organization – the why, the reason for existing and the rationale for your anticipated path. In short, this is why your organization exists. It’s important to be clear on your vision, because it’s also the underlying ‘why’ for your product or service. Without a why it’s hard to have a passion. With it, all marketing and sales comes from a place of passion and belief.

Authority

Authority is about sharing your expertise – both in your market and on your product. It’s important to be an authority and consistently demonstrate it. This is why it is important to grasp opportunities to share your views, insights and advice on a market – speak with press, brief industry analysts, share expertise over social media and comment on relevant forums and blogs. Within your company you have experts, so allow them to have their expert opinions – on the market, on what prospects needs to be aware of and to ask – and to express these opinions and demonstrate their authority.

Impact

Impact is about results – not for your organization or company, but the impact your product, service or app has on your users’ lives. Impact could relate to a cause, emotional results, or tangible results such as saving time or money and increasing business efficiency. It’s about the transformation. Sharing examples, transformations and support from existing customers is a great way to help explain this impact to prospects.

Want to hear more about how to define your vision, authority and impact to drive technology sales? Then join our ‘How to drive technology sales’ webinar on May 15 – simply register here.

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App of the week
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Opinion 2


Opinion 2

Opinion Podcasting has been the free podcasting tool of choice for many for some time now. It’s a brilliant little app that allows you to create high-quality audio podcasts, then trim and edit them with natty drag & drop tools that make the whole experience fun and easy. But in its latest update, Opinion 2 has made the logical step to add online publishing and sharing options, removing the need for a third-party export service. Opinion 2 now provides your podcast with its own webpage and an RSS feed — and it’s all still free.

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App of the week
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Linux

The correct way to pronounce the name of this revolutionary open source operating system is NOT ‘line-ux’ to rhyme with ‘mine-ux’ or ‘pine-ux’. The creator of the Linux Kernel has always been very clear that his OS should be referred to as ‘Linux’ to rhyme with ‘Win-ux’, ‘Pin-ux’ or perhaps more pertinently, ‘Finn-ux’. That’s because the Finnish born software engineer is called Linus Benedict Torvalds, and in Scandinavia everybody pronounces Linus with a short ‘I’, not a long ‘I’ like Charlie Brown and Snoopy’s friend. But there’s no need to take our word for it when you can listen to the man himself explaining. The poor chap has been trying to tell everyone since 1991…

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Geek speak
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“Get a pocket computer, try to do what you used to do, yeah.”

Without the help of Google, can you identify the voice behind this quote?

Tweet us at @PromptBoston and @PromptLondon if you can.

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Copy corner
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Social acceptable copy

There was a time when writing for the web was considered to be a specialist skill, separate from other forms of copywriting. Content was king, but only if it was direct, pithy, succinct, short enough to fit on one screen, and compelling enough to prompt action. Webmasters and writers determined that people online were either too busy or too fickle to devote much attention span to reading tranches of text (while presumably those who preferred to read their news printed on pulped up trees had more time to fritter away digesting long features and turning pages).

Today lines have blurred considerably and pretty much all timely, consumable, disposable writing is published on the web in some form or another. This means that all content must be written with online readers in mind. It’s entirely reasonable to expect a higher degree of skipping, scanning and flicking from someone with multiple sources of information available simultaneously at their fingertips, than just one newspaper on their lap. Immediate copy writing that fits ‘above the fold’ of most computer screens is more likely to get noticed by more people. There’s still space for quality long-form copywriting online, but if anything that initial need for brevity has been compounded further by the ubiquity of small screen mobile devices and social media.

Away from more technical considerations of SEO and keywords then, are there any enduring rules of web writing that remain appropriate for social writing? We can certainly offer half a dozen quick tips that might help if you’re struggling to be heard above the hubbub:

1. Headlines must still work hard whether you are writing a 3,000 word feature or a 200 word blog post. It’s your only chance to seize a reader’s attention with big bold type and hold it for as long as you can. A clever headline is also extremely tempting and easy to forward and share without explanation

2. Only post copy that really matters to somebody, because whether your target readers are devoting 30 seconds to your piece or 30 minutes, they still need to understand clearly why you wrote it in the first place, and why they should care enough to come back for more

3. Try and make readers think ‘huh!’, or better still to utter it out loud in a cryptic way that makes other people nearby say ‘wuh?’ Copy shared is exponentially more valuable than copy swiped away, and those social media buttons are so very easy to click

4. Have faith in good copy and be patient with it. Online writing may sit on the back burner for days, or weeks, and still pick up hits and comments months or years later. Today’s copy is no longer tomorrow’s fish and chip paper

5. Be fresh, make a clear point, and ask for feedback. You’ll quickly lose trust and return visitors if you say the same old woolly things over again and never ask readers what they would like to read

6. Don’t be afraid to go long occasionally. Not everything can be explained sufficiently in 140 characters, one smartphone page, or even above the fold on a laptop screen. Never be afraid to trust your instincts and write your ideas to their natural length if you believe they need room for expression. You can always create teaser posts on your favorite social media platforms that link to the full article for those readers who trust your judgement (and have the social stamina).

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Copy corner
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Newsletters

Do you have a big email list? A small email list? Working to build an email list of any kind? No matter the you’re situation – you should absolutely be sending out e-newsletters.
Over the years, we’ve created countless newsletters for a number of clients. They’re all different lengths, different structures and are send out at different frequencies but they all wielded results.

Newsletters give you the opportunity to educate your potential, existing and past customers about your field and your company. It opens the doors for two-way communication, sparks interest and allows you to leverage existing content in new ways.

I mean, you’re reading this after all — aren’t you?

Not sure where to start? Get in touch today!

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Contact Prompt
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We hope you find our newsletter an interesting read. For any feedback on our newsletter, or to discuss how we can help you with your PR, marketing, social media/blogging initiatives, copywriting or surveys, please contact us using the details below. We are always delighted to hear from you.


London


22 Upper Ground

Eighth Floor

London

SE1 9PD


Boston


745 Atlantic Ave

Third Floor

Boston

MA 02111

info@prompt-pr.com | www.prompt-pr.com

space man
Prompt

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Copyright Prompt Communications 2015. All Rights Reserved.

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